Ankle Sprains

One of the most common injuries we see are ankle sprains. More than 3 million Americans a year experience an ankle sprain. A sprained ankle can happen anytime that the ankle is stretched too far in any direction, damaging and sometimes even tearing the ligaments that support the ankle.

 

Sprained ankles frequently result from sports or other outdoor activities. Ankle sprains result in pain at the area of the sprain, as well as redness and swelling. While it is possible to treat an ankle sprain with rest, ice, compression and elevation (called the RICE protocol) if you are experiencing a lot of pain you may want to seek out the help of a physician, as pain can be an indicator of a more serious injury. Your doctor will want to take both an x-ray of the area, to check for the possibility of fractures, as well as an ultrasound to look for injuries affecting soft tissues, such as muscles and tendons.

 

Recovery time from an ankle sprain can vary greatly, from 2 to 6 weeks or even months to fully heal, depending on the severity of the injury.

It’s easy to misstep or and twist an ankle, but it’s more likely to happen if your not wearing the proper shoes for your outdoor activities. If you go hiking you should invest in hiking books, the same as a soccer player invests in cleats. Having the proper shoes for your activity can actually help prevent ankle sprains in the first place.

 

Podiatrists are specialized doctors in treating all aspects of foot and ankle injuries, so they are the best doctor to help you recover from an ankle sprain. Ankle & Foot Associates, LLC has 18 office locations throughout southeast Georgia and coastal South Carolina, so it’s easy to find an office near you

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