Good Foods for Gout

Gout is a rheumatic disease, it causes inflammation and pain in the joints and muscles, most frequently the joints of the foot. Gout is the result of too much uric acid build up in the blood and surrounding tissues. Uric acid is produced when your body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are compounds found in high concentrations in certain foods and drinks such as alcohol (including beer), some fish and shellfish, bacon, turkey, veal, and venison.

Normally, uric acid is filtered by the kidneys and finally is passed out in urine. If the body produces too much uric acid, or the kidneys aren't filtering it properly, the uric acid can form painful crystals in the joints. Too much uric acid can put you at risk for kidney disease, kidney stones, and gout.

Gout is an inflammatory disease, so anti-inflammatory medicines, such as ibuprofen or aspirin, can help with occasional flare-ups. However, the best treatment is to prevent the cause, making dietary changes the best prevention method. Since gout occurs when the body is producing high amounts of uric acid, it's a great idea to avoid foods with high levels of purines. While certain foods can trigger gout, others can actually help alleviate it. To help avoid flare ups try to increase your intake of the following foods:

Vitamin C - Natural sources of vitamin C have been shown to significantly lower the levels of uric acid in the body. Make sure to eat plenty of citrus fruits, kale, broccoli, brussel sprouts, yellow and red bell peppers, and kiwi.

Low Fat Foods - Try to eat foods that are lower in fat, or even fat-free dairy products, which studies suggest can help to lower the risk of flare ups.

Berries - Especially the dark varieties, like blackberries and blueberries, have been shown to help regulate the production of uric acid.

Gout attacks can be very painful and the pain can come on strong and suddenly. That's why the best way to treat gout is to prevent attacks from happening in the first place. Stay away from food and alcohol that can trigger an attack and make sure to eat lots of foods shown to prevent the build up of purines. If you are still experiencing pain from a gout flare up then it’s time to call Ankle & Foot Associates, LLC.

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