What is Plantar Fasciitis?

“My feet hurt when I take my first step out of bed in the morning”. This is something we hear all the time in our offices, and it is a telltale sign of heel pain, also known as plantar fasciitis. The pain results from an inflammation in the plantar fascia, the flat band of tissue on the underside of the foot that connects the bones of the heel to those of the toes. Plantar fasciitis usually results from prolonged use of unsupportive footwear, but in some instances can be caused by acute injuries as well. Plantar fasciitis is a common cause of foot pain, with over 3 million cases reported in the US each year.

 

Podiatrists use a variety of treatment methods for plantar fasciitis:

 

 

The podiatrists at Ankle & Foot Associates have a bevy of treatment options available from conservative to physical therapy to surgical. We offer PRP (platelet-rich plasma) therapy, which a recent study has shown to be as effective as traditional corticosteroid treatments. We also offer Topaz, a minimally invasive radiofrequency treatment, as well as EPAT (sound wave therapy).

 

So if you or a loved one is suffering from heel pain, make an appointment with your nearest Ankle & Foot Associates location. The doctors and staff will he happy to help you get back on the path to a happy, healthy active life.

You Might Also Enjoy...

3 of the Most Common Risk Factors of Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition that causes discomfort in your heel. It’s most evident in the morning, and it can interfere with routine activity. You’ve heard people complain about plantar fasciitis and heel pain — are you at risk?

Diabetic Foot Ulcers

It may not surprise you to hear, but complications from diabetes are the top cause of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations in the US.

Plantar Fasciitis Pain

As podiatrists, we often hear the general complaint of “heel pain” or a pain underneath the foot that is sharp when first standing and walking, but as time goes on the pain will dissipate.

Morton's Neuroma

Have you ever felt like there was a pebble in your shoe, or that your sock keeps bunching up under your foot? You may be experiencing the early stages of a neuroma.